Tucked in at Home – Snowe

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Tucked in at Home 

So, we’re all going to be spending some more time at home. Let’s try to make the most of it. Sure, you could attack every nagging project you’ve had or frantically clean the cupboards out of anxiety, but let’s take a second to remember the actual purpose of all these tasks. The idea is to create serenity and balance in your space—not “win” at organization because you are trapped inside. Everything you do for your home should be because it’ll make the next day that much better. This is the time to make your home an efficient, inviting sanctuary for living. Focus on the essentials—what helps dry off when you get out of the shower, what holds your lunch, and what supports your head when you go to sleep—and make getting between all those points as frictionless as possible. We can’t promise you’ll find peace, but you will be more likely to find what you are looking for in your closet.

 



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We talked to two gurus in organization and design, Lisa Ruff, an expert from the Neat Method, and interior designer Anne Sage, about how to fill your home with what you need to make it an absolute oasis. This isn’t a toss everything moment, it’s about streamlining to beautiful basics so you can simplify your life.  

 

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Rinse and Repeat 

 

Start where you start your day. 

 

“If you struggle to get ready in the morning for work, then maybe it’s your closet or bathroom,” says Neat Method’s Lisa Ruff. Prioritize your tidying by focusing on what has the biggest impact on your day-to-day. 

 

Revolutionize your routine by getting rid of all those products you no longer use and the ratty towels you always shove back to the bottom of the pile. Then give yourself a reason to look forward to opening those eyes.

 


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“I’m obsessed with good bathrobes,” says Ann Sage. “I have a lightweight one in a waffle weave for summertime and a thick plush one for cooler weather. Nothing beats wrapping myself in a super-soft, high-quality cotton robe after a hot bath or shower—it’s like a hug you wear!

 

Then, as is always great advice, “create boundaries.”

 

“Whether that means adding shelf dividers and labeling the shelves or implementing labeled baskets,” recommends Lisa. By keeping things separated, you’ll be able to find exactly what you need without needing to rifle through all that you don’t. Then take a queue from Monica Gellar. She had 11 towel categories but you can probably simplify it just a little.

  

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“Divide by room if you use different colors or styles for each room,” Lisa explains. “Divide by type if you use the same for each space, i.e. white sheets in all the bedrooms and gray towels in all the bathrooms. 

 

What do you need? It depends on you and your household’s washing routine, but we recommend at least six towels so you can be sure you aren’t doing laundry every other day (and so you are prepared for guests, double-shower days, etc). you always have a few in reserve for the family, guests, etc.

 

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The Key Ingredients 

 

The recipe for culinary frustration is a disorganized kitchen. Multiple takeout orders might mean you are trying to delay the inevitable—opening your drawers. Tackle your reorganization efforts in bite-sized chunks (the pantry one day, utensils the next), and you’ll be inspired to whip up any dish in no time.

 

“With an organized space, you’re more likely to cook from home and it is more likely to be an enjoyable process,” Lisa says. “We’ve found that clients no longer overbuy because they can easily see what they have and what they need."

 

Where to begin? This is one space where the pros recommend leaning on the label maker.

 

Labels subtly encourage people to put items away in the correct place,” Lisa says. “They are really helpful in high traffic areas like kitchens, especially if you live in a home with children, babysitters, extended family, etc..” (Hint, hint for your housemate who claims to not know where anything goes.

 

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Here, the key is to strike the balance of having the right amount of the right things. Do you need all those gadgets you never use? No. But would you be way better off if you had an extra set of flatware so you don’t have to hand wash forks before you dive into dessert? Yes. If you haven’t used it in the last six months, you probably don’t need it. Next Lisa recommends keeping like items together as much as possible so you don’t forget that you have them, and giving items space to ensure you don’t forget.

 

“If you cannot see it and easily access it, you’re never going to use it,” Lisa says.

 

 

  

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Sleep On It 

 

Now let’s tuck into the last section—your linen closet. The bulkiest, hardest-to-fold, pieces you own can seem daunting, but here’s where you can reward yourself a bit.

 

“It is worth investing in coordinating organizational products like matching bins or baskets that match the aesthetic of your home,” says Lisa. “It increases the overall sense of organization and decreases visual clutter.”

 

Like labels, good looking storage will encourage you to use it. If it’s something you don’t need often, take the opposite approach.

 

“Space-saving bags are great for bulkier items,” Lisa says. “You can then store them under the bed that they belong to or on an upper shelf in a linen closet. It’s a good idea to keep like items together as much as possible so you don’t forget that you have them.”

 

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That means stowing your sheets for the kids or guest room separately from the ones for your bed. Opt for bedding that gives you options and changing the sheets won’t feel like a chore. We recommend having at least 2-3 sets of sheets for each bed in your house—one to have on the bed, one can be dirty, one can be ready to go.


Ann Sage keeps a stash of mix-and-match neutrals and patterns, “Depending on how I’m feeling that week, it’s fun to have options for creating different moods and palette combinations,” she says. (If you need help making the bed, you could start here.)


At the end of the day, the goal is making sure your house made your day easier, not more annoying. Having the right essentials means you can rest and routine easier, no matter what's going on outside.

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